Skip to content

Bible In Chronological Order With Apocrypha

The Bible is one of the most important books in human history, and it has changed the way we see ourselves and our place in the world. The Bible is a collection of texts that tell several different stories about people—both real and fictional—from thousands of years ago. But how do those stories fit together? In this article, we’ll break down the order in which all these stories happened chronologically. Then you can decide if you want to read them in order or just skip ahead to your favorite parts!

Pre-Creation

The first book in the Bible is Genesis, which covers the pre-creation period. In this book, you will learn about God creating everything that exists. You will see how he created the world and all of its people, animals and plants. He also created angels to serve him as well as many other things that we see today such as our planet Earth and all its life forms including human beings. It’s an amazing story filled with so much information but don’t worry because this article will help you understand each event without having to read through 500 pages!

Creation to Jacob’s Journey to Paddan Aram

  • Adam and Eve’s sin in the Garden of Eden
  • Noah’s Ark and the Great Flood
  • The Tower of Babel

Shechem Incident

Shechem

The story of Jacob’s sons begins in Genesis 34, when they travel from Beersheba to a place called Shechem. Shechem was an important town where two of its princes had just died. There were also many women who were now without husbands, as well as a large amount of wealth that would no longer be under their protection.

Jacob’s sons arrive at this city and begin to harass these women until one night they approach the homes where they live and kill the men who live there! Then they take their wives for themselves and take all their wealth for themselves too! But then something happens: When Jacob finds out about what his sons have done he gets very upset because it was against God’s laws to marry someone else’s wife even if she was not married before her husband died so he tells them “It is not right that we should make slaves of our wives.” He asks them why did you do such things? They say because we saw how beautiful these women were but he says “because we saw how beautiful these women were doesn’t mean it is ok” even though those guys are dead now so you can’t punish them anymore.”

Abraham

Abraham is the father of the Jewish people. He was born in Ur of the Chaldeans and was considered a prophet by Muslims and Christians alike. Abraham is also credited with being one of the first patriarchs in Judaism, as well as being considered an ancestor of many nations, including Arabs and North Africans. This figure is mentioned throughout both the Old Testament (Genesis) and New Testament (Galatians 3:16).

Abraham’s story begins with his birth in Ur, where he lived under King Nimrod’s rule until he decided to move his family out of that city because they were being persecuted for their beliefs about God. He then moved them to Haran where they stayed for some time before moving on again when famine struck that land too. After another long journey through various parts of Canaanite territory while avoiding conflict by staying unnoticed amongst other groups’ lands (or paying tribute), they finally settled down at Shechem where Abraham became friends with Abimelech king over Gerar who allowed him and Sarah dwell there together peacefully until one day Abimelech brought Sarah into his palace without asking permission first which angered Abimelech’s wife Zilpah so much that she sent her maidservant Hagar back out into desert with child Ishmael who had been born during their stay at Gerar; but this time alone instead without her husband because she didn’t want another child born outside marriage.”

Jacob and Esau

Jacob and Esau were twins. Jacob was born first, but Esau was the firstborn because he came out of the womb before Jacob. Esau was also called Edom, which means “red” in Hebrew.

Jacob loved Esau more than he did himself and gave him a blessing before they were even born! He said that Esau would live in tents while Jacob would be a man of peace who dwells in houses (Genesis 25:27). However, this prophecy didn’t come true until much later on when they both grew up to marry wives of their own choosing (Genesis 29-30).

Jacob’s Journey to Paddan Aram

Jacob’s Journey to Paddan Aram (Genesis 28:10 – 31:21)

Joseph, Jacob’s son, had been sold into slavery by his brothers after they had discovered that Joseph was their brother. He was taken to Egypt and later rose to become second in command under the Pharaoh of Egypt at the time. As a result of Joseph’s rise in rank, he was able to interpret a dream for the Pharaoh that predicted seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine. The Pharaoh then appointed Joseph as his Prime Minister and put him in charge of acquiring provisions during times of plenty so they could be stored away until they were needed during times of famine. Due to this great blessing from God on Joseph’s life, Jacob decided it would be best if he himself moved down river from Beersheba toward Paddan Aram where his brother lived (Haran).

Isaac

Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah, and the father of Jacob and Esau. He lived to be 180 years old.

Isaac made a lasting impression on his grandson Joseph, who remembered him fondly in his famous story about being sold into slavery by his brothers.

Marriage of Isaac and Rebekah

The chronology of the Bible is a complicated process. The books were written by many different authors, at different times, and in slightly different ways. This means that there are several places where the order of events might vary from book to book.

There are also many minor inconsistencies within each book that may make you wonder what exactly happened when. For example, Genesis 24:15 says Rebekah was already engaged to Isaac when Abimelech took her away from her family—but we know from Genesis 21:14-21 that Abraham sent his servant Eliezer on this mission because he thought she was too young (too young for marriage!)

Esau’s Marriages

Esau married two Hittite women:

  • Adah, daughter of Elon the Hittite
  • Basemath, daughter of Ishmael and sister of Nabaioth.

Esau married two Canaanite women:

  • Mahalath, daughter of Ishmael and sister of Nebaioth; she was probably identical with the Maacah mentioned in 2 Samuel 3:3 as being a granddaughter of Absalom and Tamar. She is called Mooab’s daughter in 1 Chronicles 1:50; but since we know that this Moab was a son-in-law rather than a father-in-law to Esau (Genesis 36:4), it is probable that Mahalath or Maacah simply means “the woman.” If so, she would seem to have been no other than Mahalath/Maacah his own sister’s child (Genesis 27:46). See CALFEDE’S COMMENTARY IN loco.

Sale of the Birthright Jacob Marries Leah and Rachel Birth of the Sons of Jacob

Jacob’s family

Jacob was a son of Isaac, who was the son of Abraham. Jacob had twelve sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher and Issachar. He also had two daughters named Dinah and Rachel. Leah was his first wife and she gave birth to six of his children: Reuben (born in Padanaram), Simeon (born in Padanaram), Levi (born in Paddan-Aram), Judah (also called Yehudah or Yada’a) (born in Canaan), Zebulun and Dinah. Rachel was his second wife and she gave birth to Joseph as well as Benjamin while they were living at home with Jacob’s father-in-law Laban in Haran.

Joseph

Joseph was sold by his brothers into slavery in Egypt, where he became a powerful ruler. He interpreted Pharaoh’s dreams and was given power in Egypt, but later had to flee because of a famine. In Egypt, Joseph married Asenath and had two sons with her: Manasseh and Ephraim. Joseph also had two other sons named Manasseh and Ephraim who were born to an Egyptian woman named Asenath (Genesis 41:50).

Joseph died at the age of 110 years old and was buried in Shechem (Genesis 50:24-25).

Joseph Sold by His Brothers Joseph in Egypt Joseph Interprets Pharaoh’s Dreams

The Bible

  • Joseph Sold by His Brothers
  • Joseph in Egypt Joseph Interprets Pharaoh’s Dreams
  • Genesis 37:1-50:26
  • Exodus 1:1-14:31 2 Kings 23:13-17; Jeremiah 44:23 & 25 (30)
  • Leviticus 1 – 3 Kings 8 Ezekiel 39 through 43 (the Lord has returned many times since then, but this was the last time that He came to earth.)

The Bible has been broken down into chronological parts.

There are many ways to break down the Bible, but one way is by chronological order. This means you read from Genesis to Revelation and cover each book as it was written chronologically. For example, when we read through the Old Testament, people often skip over certain books and then go back later when they feel like it’s necessary. Or they may read some chapters but not others based on what their church teaches or what their pastor thinks is important for them to know at this point in their lives.

The New Testament has been broken down into themes that each author covered during his time writing letters:

Conclusion

The Bible has been broken down into chronological parts.

Bible In Chronological Order With Apocrypha

The Bible is one of the most important books in human history, and it has changed the way we see ourselves and our place in the world. The Bible is a collection of texts that tell several different stories about people—both real and fictional—from thousands of years ago. But how do those stories fit together? In this article, we’ll break down the order in which all these stories happened chronologically. Then you can decide if you want to read them in order or just skip ahead to your favorite parts!

Pre-Creation

The first book in the Bible is Genesis, which covers the pre-creation period. In this book, you will learn about God creating everything that exists. You will see how he created the world and all of its people, animals and plants. He also created angels to serve him as well as many other things that we see today such as our planet Earth and all its life forms including human beings. It’s an amazing story filled with so much information but don’t worry because this article will help you understand each event without having to read through 500 pages!

Creation to Jacob’s Journey to Paddan Aram

  • Adam and Eve’s sin in the Garden of Eden
  • Noah’s Ark and the Great Flood
  • The Tower of Babel

Shechem Incident

Shechem

The story of Jacob’s sons begins in Genesis 34, when they travel from Beersheba to a place called Shechem. Shechem was an important town where two of its princes had just died. There were also many women who were now without husbands, as well as a large amount of wealth that would no longer be under their protection.

Jacob’s sons arrive at this city and begin to harass these women until one night they approach the homes where they live and kill the men who live there! Then they take their wives for themselves and take all their wealth for themselves too! But then something happens: When Jacob finds out about what his sons have done he gets very upset because it was against God’s laws to marry someone else’s wife even if she was not married before her husband died so he tells them “It is not right that we should make slaves of our wives.” He asks them why did you do such things? They say because we saw how beautiful these women were but he says “because we saw how beautiful these women were doesn’t mean it is ok” even though those guys are dead now so you can’t punish them anymore.”

Abraham

Abraham is the father of the Jewish people. He was born in Ur of the Chaldeans and was considered a prophet by Muslims and Christians alike. Abraham is also credited with being one of the first patriarchs in Judaism, as well as being considered an ancestor of many nations, including Arabs and North Africans. This figure is mentioned throughout both the Old Testament (Genesis) and New Testament (Galatians 3:16).

Abraham’s story begins with his birth in Ur, where he lived under King Nimrod’s rule until he decided to move his family out of that city because they were being persecuted for their beliefs about God. He then moved them to Haran where they stayed for some time before moving on again when famine struck that land too. After another long journey through various parts of Canaanite territory while avoiding conflict by staying unnoticed amongst other groups’ lands (or paying tribute), they finally settled down at Shechem where Abraham became friends with Abimelech king over Gerar who allowed him and Sarah dwell there together peacefully until one day Abimelech brought Sarah into his palace without asking permission first which angered Abimelech’s wife Zilpah so much that she sent her maidservant Hagar back out into desert with child Ishmael who had been born during their stay at Gerar; but this time alone instead without her husband because she didn’t want another child born outside marriage.”

Jacob and Esau

Jacob and Esau were twins. Jacob was born first, but Esau was the firstborn because he came out of the womb before Jacob. Esau was also called Edom, which means “red” in Hebrew.

Jacob loved Esau more than he did himself and gave him a blessing before they were even born! He said that Esau would live in tents while Jacob would be a man of peace who dwells in houses (Genesis 25:27). However, this prophecy didn’t come true until much later on when they both grew up to marry wives of their own choosing (Genesis 29-30).

Jacob’s Journey to Paddan Aram

Jacob’s Journey to Paddan Aram (Genesis 28:10 – 31:21)

Joseph, Jacob’s son, had been sold into slavery by his brothers after they had discovered that Joseph was their brother. He was taken to Egypt and later rose to become second in command under the Pharaoh of Egypt at the time. As a result of Joseph’s rise in rank, he was able to interpret a dream for the Pharaoh that predicted seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine. The Pharaoh then appointed Joseph as his Prime Minister and put him in charge of acquiring provisions during times of plenty so they could be stored away until they were needed during times of famine. Due to this great blessing from God on Joseph’s life, Jacob decided it would be best if he himself moved down river from Beersheba toward Paddan Aram where his brother lived (Haran).

Isaac

Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah, and the father of Jacob and Esau. He lived to be 180 years old.

Isaac made a lasting impression on his grandson Joseph, who remembered him fondly in his famous story about being sold into slavery by his brothers.

Marriage of Isaac and Rebekah

The chronology of the Bible is a complicated process. The books were written by many different authors, at different times, and in slightly different ways. This means that there are several places where the order of events might vary from book to book.

There are also many minor inconsistencies within each book that may make you wonder what exactly happened when. For example, Genesis 24:15 says Rebekah was already engaged to Isaac when Abimelech took her away from her family—but we know from Genesis 21:14-21 that Abraham sent his servant Eliezer on this mission because he thought she was too young (too young for marriage!)

Esau’s Marriages

Esau married two Hittite women:

  • Adah, daughter of Elon the Hittite
  • Basemath, daughter of Ishmael and sister of Nabaioth.

Esau married two Canaanite women:

  • Mahalath, daughter of Ishmael and sister of Nebaioth; she was probably identical with the Maacah mentioned in 2 Samuel 3:3 as being a granddaughter of Absalom and Tamar. She is called Mooab’s daughter in 1 Chronicles 1:50; but since we know that this Moab was a son-in-law rather than a father-in-law to Esau (Genesis 36:4), it is probable that Mahalath or Maacah simply means “the woman.” If so, she would seem to have been no other than Mahalath/Maacah his own sister’s child (Genesis 27:46). See CALFEDE’S COMMENTARY IN loco.

Sale of the Birthright Jacob Marries Leah and Rachel Birth of the Sons of Jacob

Jacob’s family

Jacob was a son of Isaac, who was the son of Abraham. Jacob had twelve sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher and Issachar. He also had two daughters named Dinah and Rachel. Leah was his first wife and she gave birth to six of his children: Reuben (born in Padanaram), Simeon (born in Padanaram), Levi (born in Paddan-Aram), Judah (also called Yehudah or Yada’a) (born in Canaan), Zebulun and Dinah. Rachel was his second wife and she gave birth to Joseph as well as Benjamin while they were living at home with Jacob’s father-in-law Laban in Haran.

Joseph

Joseph was sold by his brothers into slavery in Egypt, where he became a powerful ruler. He interpreted Pharaoh’s dreams and was given power in Egypt, but later had to flee because of a famine. In Egypt, Joseph married Asenath and had two sons with her: Manasseh and Ephraim. Joseph also had two other sons named Manasseh and Ephraim who were born to an Egyptian woman named Asenath (Genesis 41:50).

Joseph died at the age of 110 years old and was buried in Shechem (Genesis 50:24-25).

Joseph Sold by His Brothers Joseph in Egypt Joseph Interprets Pharaoh’s Dreams

The Bible

  • Joseph Sold by His Brothers
  • Joseph in Egypt Joseph Interprets Pharaoh’s Dreams
  • Genesis 37:1-50:26
  • Exodus 1:1-14:31 2 Kings 23:13-17; Jeremiah 44:23 & 25 (30)
  • Leviticus 1 – 3 Kings 8 Ezekiel 39 through 43 (the Lord has returned many times since then, but this was the last time that He came to earth.)

The Bible has been broken down into chronological parts.

There are many ways to break down the Bible, but one way is by chronological order. This means you read from Genesis to Revelation and cover each book as it was written chronologically. For example, when we read through the Old Testament, people often skip over certain books and then go back later when they feel like it’s necessary. Or they may read some chapters but not others based on what their church teaches or what their pastor thinks is important for them to know at this point in their lives.

The New Testament has been broken down into themes that each author covered during his time writing letters:

The Bible has been broken down into chronological parts.

Join the conversation

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *